Spencer Finch 
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Spencer Finch, "Ill tell you how the Sun rose"

Stockholm, August 23rd - September 30th, 2012
Image No. 1 of Spencer Finch

Installation view

 
In Spencer Finch’s exhibition at Galerie Nordenhake Stockholm the artist presents a group of recorded observations from the natural world. Often combining Conceptual and Impressionist practices Finch reflects on the tautologous nature of seeing, the limits of visual perception and the fallibility of recollection. Sometimes his works originate from his own individual perceptions, of light, color, darkness for example, while his methodology is often scientific in its precision. However, all his work is strongly anchored in often-poetic references to literature, philosophy, mythologies and even historic observations from the scientific cannon.

His exhibition at the gallery partly comprises a group of works dealing with atmospheric phenomena and relating to the landscape. A highly industrialized and urban waterway is recalled via Impressionist images of water lilies, sunsets and seascapes in a color study of the Gowanus canal (which passes the artist’s studio in Brooklyn) using the amalgamated hues from picture postcards of works by Monet. The breeze as recorded passing through the bedroom window at Emily Dickinson’s home in Amherst, MA, is evoked in exactness with the use of a table fan. In an eclectic variety of media and themes Finch also takes on cloud formations, moon shadows and stone wall formations.
 
A second group of works embodies a more formal character. The lightbox Yellow Square reveals the spectral breakdown of the color yellow. A red, green and blue grid of squares emits yellow light on the reflecting walls. This work is accompanied by a series of 15 collages arranged using colored paper and filters. The series is based on Wittgenstein's Remarks on Color in which the philosopher reflects on Goethe's attempt to clarify the use of language about color.
 

Spencer Finch was born in New Haven, Connecticut, in 1962, and lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. He participated in Venice Biennial in 2009, the Turin Triennial in 2008 and the Whitney Biennial in 2004. A survey exhibition titled “What Time Is It on the Sun?” was on view at MASS MoCA, North Adams in 2007-2008. Recent solo exhibitions include: Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, RI (2012), The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, La Jolla, CA, Emily Dickinson Museum, Amherst MA (2011), Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington DC, Pallant House, Chichester, UK, Frac des Pays de la Loire, Carquefou, France (2010), Queensland Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane (2009), Dundee Centre for Contemporary Art, Scotland (2008), Museum of Modern Art Ljubljana (2005), Portikus, Frankfurt/Main and Artpace, San Antonio (both 2003). He has taken part in numerous group exhibitions, most recently "NEON, La materia luminosa dell'arte", MACRO, Rome (2012), "More Light", Museum De Fundatie, Zwolle (2011), "Haunted: Contemporary Photography/Video/Performance", Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (2010), "50 Moons of Saturn", Turin Triennale (2008), “Refract, Reflect, Project: Light Work from the Collection”, Hirshhorn Museum, Washington D.C. (2007), “Light Art from Artificial Light”, ZKM Karlsruhe and “Colour After Klein”, Barbican Art Gallery, London (both 2005). His large-scale window installation “The River that Flows Both Ways” is currently on view at the public park “The Highline” in New York.

 svensk
  
Image No. 2 of Spencer Finch

Gowanus Canal from Carroll Street Bridge, 2012, paper collage mounted on aluminum, 86.4 x 123.2 cm (framed 93.2 x 129.4 cm)

A plein air study in landscape painting format of a view of the Gowanus Canal, Brooklyn, using reproductions of waterway paintings by Monet to match the colors of the Brooklyn landscape.

 
Image No. 3 of Spencer Finch

The Moment When Three Dimensions Become Two Dimensions (Apple Tree, 3 July, 2010, 9:38 p.m.), 2010, inkjet photograph, 56 x 76 cm (framed 63.7 x 83.6 cm), Edition of 3

A photographic document of the precise moment at twilight when the eye can no longer discern depth in the landscape.

Lump (of concrete) Mistaken for a Pile (of dirty snow), 
2010, Diameter between 44 - 53 cm, height 24 cm Secar 71, White Portland Cement, White Sand, Brooklyn Street Dirt, Black Marble Dust, Translucent Frit

A sculpture of a concrete lump that the artist initially mistook for a pile of dirty snow, including materials from the street at the site.

 
Image No. 4 of Spencer Finch

The Moment When Three Dimensions Become Two Dimensions (Apple Tree, 3 July, 2010, 9:38 p.m.), 2010

 
Image No. 5 of Spencer Finch

Lump (of concrete) Mistaken for a Pile (of dirty snow), 2010

 
Image No. 6 of Spencer Finch

Stone Wall, Litchfield County, CT 3, 2012, graphite on paper, 55.9 x 76.2 cm

 
Image No. 7 of Spencer Finch

Cloud Study (Giverny) 0486, 2012, scotch tape on paper, 53.3 x 73.7 cm (framed 57.7 x 77.4 cm)

Studies using the semi-opaque properties of scotch tape to depict cumulus clouds as observed over Monet's home in Giverny.

 
Image No. 8 of Spencer Finch

Vultures, Over Canyon Del Rio Lobos, Spain, 2012, graphite on paper, 76.5 x 111.8 cm (framed 84 x 118.8 cm)

Records of flight patterns of vultures circling in the sky in Spain. Each vulture's path is depicted with a different pencil.

 
Image No. 9 of Spencer Finch

Vultures, Over Canyon Del Mataviejas, Spain, 2012, graphite on paper, 76.5 x 111.8 cm (framed 84 x 118.8 cm)

Records of flight patterns of vultures circling in the sky in Spain. Each vulture's path is depicted with a different pencil.

 
Image No. 10 of Spencer Finch

Rain on the Studio Window (February 29, 2012), 2012, 112 x 90.5 cm, optically clear photograph

A photograph of rain on the artist's studio window with the background entirely Photoshopped out.

 
Image No. 11 of Spencer Finch

Wind (through Emily Dickinson's window, August 14, 2012, 3:22pm), 2012, fan, dimmer, lan box, 57.5 x 54 x 16 cm, Edition of 2

A re-creation of a summer breeze blowing through the window in Emily Dickinson's bedroom for 1 minute 35 seconds as measured using an anemometer. The wind speed varies between 0.5 and 4 mph.

 
Image No. 12 of Spencer Finch

Moon Shadow, Summer, (I-III), 2012, achival ink jet print, 71.1 x 71.1 cm (framed 76 x 76 cm), Ed 1 of 3 + AP

Photographs of shadows cast by moonlight in New England.

 
Image No. 13 of Spencer Finch

Moon Shadow, Summer, (I), 2012

 
Image No. 14 of Spencer Finch

Greenish Red / Reddish Green, 2012, 2x water color on paper, 76.2 x 76.2 cm each (framed 83.3 x 83.3 cm each)

A diptych recording 98 attempts to capture the illusive, impossible color Greenish-red.

 
Image No. 15 of Spencer Finch

Installation view

 
Image No. 16 of Spencer Finch

Mid-Ocean, Mid-Winter (1485 Shades of Grey), 2012, Water color on paper, 129 x 172.7 cm (framed 139.3 x 183.3 cm)

A study of 1485 shades of grey inspired by John Singer Sargent's painting Mid-Ocean, Mid-Winter from 1876.

 
Image No. 17 of Spencer Finch

Yellow Square, 2012, LED lightbox, fujitrans, 109.2 x 109.2 x 14 cm

A lightbox that explores the paradoxical relationship between the color of light and the color of image. A red, green and blue grid of squares emits yellow light on the reflecting walls.

 
Image No. 18 of Spencer Finch

Remarks on Color I, 21, 2012, 3 x filter and archival paper collage, 35.5 x 40.5 cm each (framed 46.2 x 41.2 cm each)

Visualizations of selected observations from Wittgenstein's Remarks on Color.

I, 21 Runge: If we were to think of a bluish-orange, a reddish-green, or a yellowish violet, we would have the same feeling as in the case of a southwesterly northwind…

 
Image No. 19 of Spencer Finch

Remarks on Color, installation view

 
Image No. 20 of Spencer Finch

Remarks on Color III, 129, 2012, filter and archival paper collage
35.5 x 40.5 cm (framed 46.2 x 41.2 cm)

Visualizations of selected observations from Wittgenstein's Remarks on Color.

III, 129 Couldn't there be people who don't understand our way of speaking when we say that orange is a reddish-yellow?





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