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WEBSITE OF
Spencer Finch 



EXHIBITIONS AT
GALERIE NORDENHAKE

Berlin, April 2017
Berlin, November 2013
Stockholm, August 2012
Berlin, April 2010
Berlin, December 2007
Berlin, March 2005

Spencer Finch

Image No. 1 of Spencer Finch

Newton's Theory of Color and Music, 2016, Fluorescent fixtures and filters, Installed at Steinway & Sons, New York

Image No. 2 of Spencer Finch

Shadow of Orange Tree (After Lorca), 2016, Fluorescent lights, fixtures, filters, 210 x 240 x 5 cm

Image No. 3 of Spencer Finch

Trying To Remember the Color of the Sky on That September Morning, 2014

Image No. 4 of Spencer Finch

8456 Shades of Blue (After Hume), Detail, 2008, Ink on paper, 28 Drawings: overall dimensions: 391 x 533 cm; each 55,9 x 76,2 cm

Image No. 5 of Spencer Finch

Passing Cloud, 2010, Fluorescent light fixtures and lamps, filters, mono-filament, and clothespins, Dimension variable Installation view at Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington D.C.

 

Image No. 6 of Spencer Finch

Moonlight (Venice, March 10, 2009), 2009, Filters and tape, dimensions variable, installed for Fare Mondi/Making Worlds, Venice Biennial, 2009

Image No. 7 of Spencer Finch

West (Sunset in my motel room, Monument Valley, January 26, 2007, 5:36-6:06 pm), 2007, 9-channel synchronized video installation with 9 TV monitors, 9 DVD players and sync unit, Running time: 31 min, 5 sec, Dimensions variable, shelving and monitors: 182 x 206 x 73,7 cm, Edition of 3

Image No. 8 of Spencer Finch

Floating Cherry Blossoms (Stream), 2016, Series of five archival inkjet prints, each 58.7 x 58.7 cm 

Image No. 9 of Spencer Finch

Light in an Empty Room (Studio at Night), 2015, Mixed Media, Dimensions variable; Dimensions at Art Unlimted, Basel 2015: (H)400 x (W)1000 x (L)750 cm

Image No. 10 of Spencer Finch

Mars Black (3Fe2O3•FeO), 2003, 60 fixtures and 255 light bulbs (15 units, á 4 fixtures), dimensions variable

Image No. 11 of Spencer Finch

Installation view, My Business, with the Cloud, 2010, Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington DC

Image No. 12 of Spencer Finch

Moondust (Apollo 17), 2009, 150 light fixtures and 417 incandescent light bulbs, dimensions variable, installation view at Fare Mondi/Making Worlds, Venice Biennial, 2009

Spencer Finch was born in New Haven, Connecticut, in 1962, and currently lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

He has participated in the Folkestone Triennial, UK (2011), the 53rd Venice Biennial (2009), the Turin Triennial (2008) and the Whitney Biennial (2004). A survey exhibition titled “What Time Is It on the Sun?” was on view at MASS MoCA, North Adams in 2007-2008. His long-term installation “Cosmic Latte” will be on view at the museum beginning in May. 


Spencer Finch has exhibited internationally since the early 1990s. His recent solo exhibitions include: The Morgan Library and Museum New York; Montclair Art Museum; Turner Contemporary, Margate (2014); Indianapolis Museum of Art, Indiana; FRAC Basse-Normandie, Caen (both 2013), Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence (2012), The Art Institute of Chicago; Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego; Emily Dickinson Museum, Amherst MA (all 2011); Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington DC and FRAC des Pays de la Loire, Carquefou (both 2010).


Spencer Finch was chosen to create the only work of art commissioned for the National September 11 Memorial and Museum, New York which opened in 2014. His installation “Lost Man Creek” recreating, at a 1:100 scale, a 790-acre section of the Redwood National Park in California, is on view at MetroTech Commons, Downtown Brooklyn until May 2018. His commission for the Crossrail Paddington Station in London titled “A Cloud Index” will open in 2018. Other recent public commissions include: “The Western Mystery,“ Olympic Sculpture Park, Seattle Art Museum; “Newton’s Theory of Color and Music (Goldberg Variations),” Steinway, New York (2016); “Kentucky Sunlight (Lincoln’s Birthday),” Speed Art Museum, Louisville (2016); the glass façade design for The Johns Hopkins Medical Center, Baltimore (2012) and “The River that Flows Both Ways”, High Line Park, New York (2009).